View Topic "How do you slice your formats?"

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Posted By: Romy The Cat
Total Posts: 6
Joined Date: Feb 5, 2013
Roman, I don't understand how to reply to your question, "if it's true". I stated how Jared produces the stereo release of his recordings. They're mixed in analog at the session, and edited in Pyramix in DSD, or DXD crossfades in post processing. There's no EQ, reverb, DSP functions, or any other post processing functions applied. There's no other way for me to say how he produces his stereo recordings. Jared does talk about his production techniques on this site under the heading General Info > About Recording Equipment and About Channel Classics. In the latter, there's a link to a 20 minute video with additional information.

Tom, I did not ask any question I just say that if it was true and if you do not do any post-processing on digital domain besides cutting the files then it is very good and very commendable. My skepticism derives from the fact that it is also exceptionally rare and the industry people have absolutely no need/reasons to do it because of multiple factors.
Posted : Feb 13, 2013
Posted By: Tom Caulfield
Total Posts: 12
Joined Date: Apr 19, 2012
Roman, I agree with you in principle about the desire to not post process acoustical music recordings. Just edit them, and leave them in the format they were recorded. But that is not usually economically, or practically feasible. A great number of large orchestra recordings today are live concert recordings with a patch session. The hall ambiance of these cannot be controlled, due to the audience, so require some sort of ambiance enhancement so as not to sound like it was recorded in a clothes closet. Also, the vast majority of recording consumers would not care, or detect artificial reverb, and a small amount of compression. Actually, most complaints are that recordings are too soft. It's for us purists, a minuscule market share, that labels like Channel Classics spend the extra money to achieve recordings that mirror the actual event.

Jared's recordings are all "studio" hall recordings, where the venue is selected to compliment, and support the music and group. Optimizing the acoustic conditions allows him to achieve the balance he's looking for, and set the levels (mix) at the session. He basically uses the DSD recording process as an archival tool, requiring just editing for the release product.
Posted : Feb 15, 2013

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